Figments And Fragments Of Mahayana Buddhism In India Pdf

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Figments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India: More Collected Papers by Gregory Schopen

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval without permission in writing from the publisher, except for reading and browsing via the World Wide Web. Seen from almost any point of view, things Chinese have played a surprisingly large part in the study of Indian Buddhism.

Originally published in The Eastern Buddhist n. Reprinted with stylis- tic changes with permission of the Eastern Buddhist Society. If these scholars are correct, it is not at all clear what the dates of the Chinese trans- lations really tell us.

Instances of this sort should give us pause for thought. Chinese translations have also been used—less successfully, I think—to try to track what have been seen as developments within a given Indian text.

The nature and number of assumptions and methodological problems involved in such a use have not, however, always or ever been fully faced, and it is not impossible that some—if not a great deal—of what has been said on the basis of Chinese transla- tions about the history of an Indian text has more to do with the history of Chinese translation techniques and Chinese religious or cultural predilections than with the history of the Indian text itself.

The role of Chinese translations in the histories of Indian Buddhist literature is, of course, well known. Less well known perhaps is the impact of Chinese sources on other aspects of the study of Buddhism in India: the study of the historical geogra- phy of India and the archaeology of Buddhist India were both virtually founded on the basis of Chinese sources.

But there are [3] other cases where they have proved less useful, where knowledge of things Chinese may have been more of an obstacle than an aid to understanding the historical situation in India.

It has often been unthinkingly assumed that developments in China kept pace with and, with some lead time, chronologically paralleled devel- opments in India—that is, that the two somehow developed in tandem. The cul- tured upper classes in India, in fact, seem to have seen Buddhist monks and nuns largely as buffoons, their stock [4] character in classical Indian literature and drama.

The same holds true for the Gilgit manuscripts. Then, and only then, do we have any evidence that this literature was even known outside a tiny circle of Buddhist scholastics. But this evidence is almost a thousand years later than it should be, and before this there is no actual evidence outside of literary sources for what the text describes.

There appear to be at least two points here worth pondering. Second, the apparent periods of popularity of the Perfection of Wisdom in India and China are radically unaligned and its popularity in each is of a very dif- ferent kind: the Indian situation, it would appear, need not have any predictive value for the Chinese, nor the Chinese for the Indian.

This example of the Perfection of Wisdom may appear extreme, but the case of the vinayas already cited may be very like it. If, again, the vinayas are as old as most scholars would have them be, then fully ordered monasticism in India and China are separated once more by almost a thousand years. But rather—and as late as the sec- ond or third century—it appears as an embattled movement struggling for accep- tance.

It appears to have found itself in an awkward spot on several issues. They are at the heart of the six perfections. Why then is the conception of the Buddha as inconceivable not accepted? Again this sort of rhetoric runs like a refrain throughout the discussion. This sort of rhetoric and name calling is generally not as- sociated with a strong, self-assured, established movement with broad support and wide acceptance.

Its position would seem to be clear. But from despising there is evil—how could that be good? This has the smell of a retreat. There are, of course, some problems here. What the observer sees as rhetoric the insider may see as self-evident and hold as [10] conviction.

Sociologists, however, who have studied sectarian groups in a variety of contexts have shown that this sort of characterization is typical of small, embattled groups on the fringes or margins of dominant, established parent groups.

There is also the problem of our author. But scholarly consensus, of course, has often had to be revised, and in this case too that may occur. One reason for this—indeed one ironical obstacle to admitting this material into the discussion—has probably been the uncomfortable implications that it carries for two concerned groups.

Here, of course, I can only quickly summarize sev- eral large bodies of data. Here too I can only summarize a large body of data. But they do not know this! They are not aware of this! They have no faith in it! For the moment, though, several points need to be noted here.

These orders, it is beginning to appear, may well have developed as very successful institutions, well suited—through a series of interlocking and mutual religious, economic, and social obligations—to the needs of their local communities. Established groups securely set in their social environment have little motive to move.

It is the marginalized, those having little or limited access to economic re- sources, social prestige, and political power, that have strong incentives to leave— the unsuccessful. That at least is a distinct possibility. This paper has had already a rather long life.

Yet another version was presented as a pub- lic lecture at Otani University in Kyoto in I would here especially like to thank the authorities of Otani for their invitation, which allowed me to spend several weeks over a period of two years at their university, and very especially I would like to warmly thank Professor Nobuchiyo Odani, who made my stays productive, pleasant, and fun.

See S. Chakrabarti, A History of Indian Archeology. From the Beginning to New Delhi: 48— That this dependence on Chinese sources has also resulted in some serious distortions is clear enough in general terms but badly needs to be carefully studied.

See most recently G. See M. Narain Delhi: —; L. Siegel, Laughing Matters. See, for example, L. Papers in Honour of Prof. Emmerick and D. Weber Frankfurt am Main: —, esp. Buddhist Manuscripts, ed. Braarvig Oslo: Vol.

I, 1—51; L. II, 37— XIII below]. For a sampling of such colophons see R. Banerji, The Palas of Bengal, On the question of authenticity, see D.

Lindtner, Nagarjuniana. Since I refer only to Ch. IV, I frequently give only the verse numbers. For the sake of convenience of reference, see S.

See below, p. Lopez Jr. Princeton: — Traditional Hermeneutics in South Asia, ed. Timm Albany: —, esp. La Siddhi de Hiuan-Tsang Paris: t. XVI 20— VIII below]. VIII below, n. I, 88, no. XC; cf. Narain Delhi: —, esp. The text of the inscription is most conveniently available in Sircar, Select Inscriptions i, Its date has been much debated and has generated a large bibliography. For what ap- pears to me to be the most convincing evidence—the archaeological evidence—see S.

Essays in Honour of A. Basham, ed. Mukherjee Calcutta: 71— Boyer, E. Rapson, and E. I, n. So too has R. II, — The reference here is to a fragmentary painted inscription in Cave 22, and the readings are far from certain.

I follow the suggestions of N. Chakrabarti in G.

Gregory Schopen - Figments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India, Chapter 1

In these articles, Gregory Schopen once again displays the erudition and originality that have contributed to a major shift in the way that Indian Buddhism is perceived, understood, and studied. Gregory Schopen is Rush C. In addition to his international appointments, Schopen has served on the faculties of Indiana University, Bloomington, and the University of Texas, Austin. Figments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press;

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval without permission in writing from the publisher, except for reading and browsing via the World Wide Web. Seen from almost any point of view, things Chinese have played a surprisingly large part in the study of Indian Buddhism. Originally published in The Eastern Buddhist n. Reprinted with stylis- tic changes with permission of the Eastern Buddhist Society.

Figments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India: More Collected Papers is the third in a series of collected essays by one of todays most distinguished scholars of Indian Buddhism. In the articles, Gregory Schopen once again displays theMoreFigments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India: More Collected Papers is the third in a series of collected essays by one of todays most distinguished scholars of Indian Buddhism. In the articles, Gregory Schopen once again displays the erudition and orginality that have contributed to a major shift in the way that Indian Buddhism is perceived, understood, and studied. Atglen, Pennsylvania: Whitford Press, , p Exactly why I stay away from hood niggas.

Buddhism: Theravada: Early & Indian Buddhism

Most modern scholars seem to assume that Buddhist monks in early India had a good knowledge of Buddhist doctrine and at least of basic Buddhist texts. But the compilers of the vinayas or monastic codes seem not to have shared this assumption. The examples presented here are drawn primarily from one vinaya , and show that the compilers put in place a whole series of rules to deal with situations in which monks were startlingly ignorant of both doctrine and text. One of these examples is particularly interesting for what it suggests about the linguistic sophistication of nuns, and another because it presents a case in which a nun is required to fill an important liturgical role in public and in the presence of monks.

On Incompetent Monks and Able Urbane Nuns in a Buddhist Monastic Code

and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India

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In these articles, Gregory Schopen once again displays the erudition and originality that have contributed to a major shift in the way that Indian Buddhism is perceived, understood, and studied. When ordering or registering on our site, as appropriate, you may be asked to enter your: name, e-mail address, mailing 0address, phone number or credit card information. You may, however, visit our site anonymously. Website log files collect information on all requests for pages and files on this website's web servers. Log files do not capture personal information but do capture the user's IP address, which is automatically recognized by our web servers. This information is used to ensure our website is operating properly, to uncover or investigate any errors, and is deleted within 72 hours.


In these articles, Gregory Schopen once again displays the erudition and originality that have contributed to a major shift in the way that Indian Buddhism is​.


Perspectives from Asian Religions

 Ты же знаешь, что я бы осталась, - сказала она, задержавшись в дверях, - но у меня все же есть кое-какая гордость. Я просто не желаю играть вторую скрипку - тем более по отношению к подростку. - Моя жена вовсе не подросток, - возмутился Бринкерхофф.  - Она просто так себя ведет. Мидж посмотрела на него с удивлением. - Я вовсе не имела в виду твою жену.

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    Figments and Fragments of Mahayana Buddhism in India: More Collected Papers Read Online · Download PDF. Save CHAPTER I The Mahāyāna and the Middle Period in Indian Buddhism: Through a Chinese Looking-Glass. (pp. 3-​24).

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